What is Vervain Tea good for? The short answer is quite a lot. For starters, it tastes great. When combined with a healthy and active lifestyle, however, it can offer so much more. Indeed, Vervain Tea, according to the latest scientific research, can improve life in small yet significant ways. This article will explain how and why.

Before we do that, though, let’s look at “what is Vervain Tea” and “Does Vervain Tea have Caffeine.” Later in this article, we will also talk about the potential side effects (spoiler alert: they’re minimal and uncommon!) and where to buy Vervain Tea.

What is Vervain Tea?

What is Vervain Tea?

Vervain Tea is a Herbal Tea that comes from the Verbena officinalis plant. It goes by an almost unimaginable multitude of nicknames. This includes “Enchanter’s Balm”, “Herb of the Cross”, “Herb of Grace, “Devil’s Medicine”, “Juno’s Tears”, “Pigeon Grass”, “Pigeon Weed”, “Simpler’s Joy”, “Wild Hyssop”, “Ironweed, and “Indian Hyssop”. And that’s to name but a few!

The plant itself is a slender perennial that can grow up to one metre high, producing pale-lilac flowers. It likely originated from the Mediterranean but has since spread throughout much of the world. It flourishes, in particular, in Canada and the United States.

The Ancient Egyptians first believed that Vervain came from the tears of their God, Isis. Centuries later, the Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder (23 - 79 CE) first contemplated the question “what is Vervain Tea good for” by studying its health benefits. Around this time, European druids, particularly in Ireland, used the herb to ward off evil spirits.

Today, we drink Vervain Tea less for the supernatural and more for its extraordinarily complex yet delicious taste. When brewed, it has earthy, herbaceous notes with bold astringent undertones. Additionally, many health-conscious individuals choose this beverage for its well-documented benefits. When it comes to “what is Vervain Tea good for?”, it depends on what you want from it!

Does Vervain Tea Have Caffeine?

Does Vervain Tea Have Caffeine?

Around 60 plants naturally contain caffeine. This includes Tea, Coffee and Yerba Mate. Vervain Herbal Tea, on the other hand, isn’t a “Tea” in the conventional sense. In fact, it’s technically a Herbal “Tisane”, although this name is seldom used. Ultimately, it contains no leaves from the Camellia sinensis (Tea) plant, and as such, is entirely a caffeine free tea.

Some consider this a benefit of sorts. Those who’re caffeine sensitive, for example, may well choose a brew like this one to avoid side effects of jitteriness or sleeplessness. NHS Choices also recommends that pregnant women do not exceed more than 200 mg of caffeine per day. With this infusion, you don’t have to worry about any at all!

Vervain Tea Benefits

Vervain Tea Benefits

Some consider Vervain a forgotten medicinal plant. No one could blame them, either. Indeed, there are those who haven’t even heard of this Herbal Tea, let alone its benefits! Here at The Kent and Sussex Tea and Coffee Company, however, we believe it’s time that changed. You can make that change right here with us.

Recent evidence has given us almost countless new reasons to fall in love with this infusion. It contains a variety of bioactive compounds that positively interact with the body, thus providing relief from several ailments. Research suggests that, among other qualities, it is antispasmodic, antipyretic, diuretic, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory.

But what is Vervain Tea good for, exactly?

Vervain Tea Sleep

Vervain Tea Sleep

This is one example of a health benefit that dates back millennia. When consumed frequently, Vervain Tea soothes and sedates the nervous system. This not only helps you to rest well but also combats mild depression and mood swings.

One 2016 study conducted by Front Pharmacol can explain how and why. It established that the herb stimulates the release of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. This, in turn, enhances mood and well-being. Ultimately, the reason this works is because of its abundance in verbenalin, an iridoid glycoside.

Next time you’re struggling with insomnia, why not consider this brew, or in fact any of our other teas to help you sleep which can be purchased here on our website.

Helps with Digestion

Helps with Digestion

There are a few ways that this Tea can help with digestion. First, its anti-inflammatory properties, according to a 2007 study conducted by Planta Med, relieve gastrointestinal discomfort in animal models. Its antispasmodic properties have a similar effect.

Furthermore, its astringent (constrictive) qualities might improve digestive function by increasing saliva production. This, in turn, promotes both stomach acid and digestive enzyme production. Finally, there are suggestions that it could alleviate cramps, bloating and flatulence.

Liver and Kidney Health

Liver and Kidney Health

Active ingredients such as aucubin and oleanolic acid found in Vervain Herbal Tea can exert hepatoprotective effects. Hepatoprotection, also known as anti-hepatotoxicity, refers to preventing damage to the liver. This is opposite to hepatotoxicity.

Preliminary research also suggests that it might work as a diuretic. This essentially supports the elimination of toxins in the body. You can read more about “is Tea a diuretic?” in our blog. It’s vital to note, however, the term “preliminary”. This means that until we know more, The Kent and Sussex Tea and Coffee Company do not endorse this Tea, or any Tea, for liver or kidney health.

Vervain Tea Side Effects

Vervain Tea Side Effects

There is little evidence to suggest that Vervain Tea causes adverse side effects. Some health professionals, however, would advise against drinking it while pregnant. For this reason, we strongly recommend talking to your doctor or midwife before consuming Vervain Tea.

An excellent alternative for those who’re pregnant is Raspberry Leaf Tea. This is a Herbal Tea that can reduce morning sickness, tone the uterine wall, and relieve painful contractions. Many midwives recommend drinking Raspberry Leaf Tea in moderation after 32 weeks of pregnancy. You can find out more information in our blog.