Darjeeling First Flush

Darjeeling First Flush Tea is so special, so extraordinarily unique, that it deserves a section of its own. This is a type of Indian Black Tea considered the crème de la crème among connoisseurs. Such is its popularity, indeed its allure, that people the world over flock to buy First Flush Darjeeling Tea as soon as it becomes available, year after year. You can learn more about it below or, simply, browse our selection.

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What is First Flush Darjeeling Tea?

What qualities make for the best First Flush Darjeeling Tea? Most important, perhaps, is the fact that, in the Darjeeling district of West Bengal, it is the first harvest of the year - hence the name. The season starts in late-February and goes on until mid-April. This particular timing, along with the region’s climatic conditions, contributes significantly to the Tea’s taste and character.

Darjeeling First Flush Black Tea tends to have a distinctly floral, muscatel note when brewed to perfection. However, the fact that the leaf is green leads some people to believe that it is Green Tea, which isn’t the case. Those who wait until later harvests will have the choice of Second Flush, Monsoon Flush or Autumnal Flush Tea - though none compare to the First Flush.

Does Darjeeling First Flush Tea Have Caffeine?

All varieties of Black Tea, including First Flush Darjeeling Tea, contain caffeine. This stimulating chemical compound provides an often much-needed boost upon consumption. It functions by blocking adenosine, a neurotransmitter that relaxes the brain while making you feel less tired. The Effects of Caffeine, in other words, do the opposite by making you feel energised.

But a question remains: How much caffeine can you expect from your cuppa? Black Tea, as a rule of thumb, has around 45-mg per 8-oz cup - more than enough to get you out of bed in the morning. Should that be too much, then the alternative is to try Decaffeinated Darjeeling Tea TGFOP. Whatever you decide, you’ve chosen well with The Kent and Sussex Tea and Coffee Company.

Benefits of Darjeeling First Flush Tea

It’s worth noting, too, that according to the latest scientific research, there are health benefits of Darjeeling First Flush Tea consumption. These come predominantly from its wealth in vitamins, minerals and other antioxidants, which, combined, combat free radicals in the body. The result is its working on a molecular level to reduce the risk of developing numerous chronic conditions.

And that’s only the beginning of its potential. We now know, for example, that it boosts the metabolism of fat cells, enabling the body to burn fat quicker and more efficiently. We know, too, that it improves your skin’s vitality while supporting the immune system and aiding digestion. There is even evidence to suggest that it enhances cognitive function and ultimately combats the early signs of dementia!

How to Brew Darjeeling First Flush Tea

The time has come to learn how to brew Darjeeling First Flush Tea so that you can appreciate its wholesome and enchanting nuances. Since you’ll be working with Loose Leaf Tea instead of Tea Bags, you’ll need either a Tea Filter or Infuser before getting started. Once you have one of these two items to hand, both of which we stock, please follow the step-by-step guide below.

1, Put the Leaves in a Tea Infuser or Filter.

2, One Teaspoon (around two grams) of it should do the trick.

3, Boil Fresh Water.

4, Put the kettle on with fresh water for better oxygen levels and, ultimately, better taste.

5, Let the Water Cool Briefly.

6, The ideal brewing temperature is 96°C.

7, Place Tea Infuser in the Cup, A porcelain cup has the least influence on flavour. Metal ones, in comparison, could create an unwelcome, if somewhat unsurprising, metallic undertone.

8, Pour in Freshly Boiled Water, Fill your favourite cup or mug with hot water.

9, Allow it to Steep for a Few Minutes.

10, Leave it for two to four minutes. Any longer, and you might find it has over-brewed.

How to Serve: Whether to have Darjeeling Tea with milk or not is up to you. You could also consider a Milk Alternative or even honey and lemon. However, we believe it tastes best served black.

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