Iced Tea

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What is Iced Tea?

Iced Tea is precisely as it sounds: Tea served chilled. It has become increasingly popular in recent years, especially as more people steer away from alcohol and instead create booze-free alternatives. However, the idea dates back centuries. Some of the first published Iced Tea Recipes appeared during the mid-1800s, many of which used Loose Leaf Green Tea as the base ingredient.

The popularisation of Iced Tea is attributed to one man: Robert Blechynden. This American merchant established a Tea-selling stall at the 1904 World’s Fair held in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. When it became too hot outside, he decided to pour ice over his product to entice more customers. It worked. But one important question remains unanswered: What kind of Tea is used for Iced Tea?

Iced Tea Flavours and Ingredients

The best Tea for Iced Tea can, quite frankly, be whatever you’d like it to be. Though some of the first examples of Homemade Iced Tea used Green Tea, Iced Tea Recipes have since branched out to accommodate Black, White and Oolong. Arguably even more widespread these days are types to include Fruit Tea. The possibilities are almost endless, be it Exotic Peach Iced Tea or Berry Fruit Cocktail Iced Fruit Tea.

Does Iced Tea Have Caffeine?

Whether you’ll find caffeine in Iced Tea depends on the variety you choose to brew. Any made from Herbal or Tisanes will almost certainly be 100% void of the stimulant. On the other hand, should you prefer, say, Ceylon Black Iced Tea, the most caffeinated kind, you can expect around 45-mg of caffeine. And then there is Green Tea with 35-mg and White Tea with 15-mg per serving.

Is Iced Tea Good for You?

Contrary to popular belief, healthy Iced Tea drinks are a thing. It very much depends on what you add. Sugar and honey, for instance, will contribute to its calories. However, should you choose to make Iced Tea as a standalone infusion, you’ll be limiting its effect on your waistline. And that’s not all on offer as, according to the latest scientific research, it might provide health benefits.

Most noteworthy is Green Tea, which contains an abundance of antioxidants such as Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). This chemical compound neutralises free radicals in the body, ultimately reducing the risk of developing numerous chronic conditions. Black Tea has a similar effect, while Hibiscus Flowers - a common component in Fruit Iced Tea - lowers blood pressure.

Side Effects of Drinking Too Much Iced Tea

Caffeine in Iced Tea might well provide an energy boost when you most need it. But too much of it can lead to side effects. This includes, but is not limited to, headaches, heart palpitations, constipation, jitteriness, restlessness and sleeplessness. It is therefore best to avoid Iced Tea before bed unless, of course, you’re brewing one void of so-called “real” Tea (i.e. from the Camellia sinensis plant).

How to Make Iced Tea

There are countless options when making Iced Tea. Perhaps the first notable decision is between how to make Iced Tea with Tea Bags and how to make Iced Tea with Loose Leaf Tea. You might also want to include alcohol such as when it comes to How to Make a Long Island Iced Tea. Nevertheless, for the following instructions, we’re going to show you an alcohol-free Iced Tea Recipe made with loose fruit pieces.

1, Put the Loose Iced Tea into a Filter or Infuser (both available here).

2, Get a heat-resistant vessel and put the Tea-filled accessory inside.

3, Boil fresh water and pour it so that it ONLY covers the Fruit Tea.

4, Allow it to steep for five to ten minutes.

5, Let it cool in the fridge, covered, until cold, for about an hour.

6, Top up with cold water and add ice cubes.

How to Serve: Consider including sugar or more fruits and berries - the choice is yours!

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