Sleep

Drinking Tea to help with sleep is, potentially, one of the best things you could do. It is, of course, essential to know the most effective sleep Tea because some might well have the opposite effect. If you’d like to discover which types of Tea before bed you should drink, please keep reading below. If you already have a grasp of the best choices, then we’d recommend that you browse our vast selection.

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Does Tea Help You Sleep at Night?

Nearly a third of the UK population experiences sleep deprivation. Could Loose Tea be the answer? It depends. When you buy so-called “real” Tea from the Camellia sinensis (Tea) plant, you’re getting a considerable amount of caffeine. Black Tea has the most with about 45-mg, Oolong has 35-37-mg, Green Tea has around 30-mg, and, finally, White Tea contains no more than 15-mg.

But why does it matter? Caffeine is a stimulating chemical compound that, upon consumption, provides an energy boost. This, perhaps understandably, is the last thing you want when you’re about to go to bed. However, there is an alternative in Decaf Tea, an infusion that has had the vast majority of its caffeine content removed. Though not a perfect solution, it is a better choice than caffeinated Tea.

You’re probably wondering by now how Tea to help with sleep works when there are seemingly so many conditions. It turns out that caffeine isn’t the only chemical compound within. Theanine is an amino acid known for improving cognitive function, alleviating minor stress and anxiety, and, perhaps most important, combating insomnia. What’s more, Tea in the conventional sense is but the beginning.

The Best Tea for Sleep

The word “Tea” no longer applies exclusively to leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant. Several varieties of Herbal and Fruit Tisanes have since become honorary members of the family, which is good news while determining what Tea helps you go to sleep. Indeed, though not a Tea in the strictest manner, Camomile Tea Bags has become one of the best choices of Tea before bed.

A 2011 study published in European Neuropsychopharmacology can explain the specifics. It found that Camomile Tea’s phytochemicals affect neurotransmitters in the brain - specifically, monoamine transmitters such as serotonin and dopamine. These same phytochemicals also influence GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptors in the central nervous system to promote a state of calmness.

Finally, Camomile Tea supports neurohormones responsible for inducing sleep. The most crucial neurohormone involved is melatonin, which regulates the wake-sleep cycle. Much of the same can be said about Lavender Tea. Researchers at the UK University of Southampton discovered that participants sleeping in a herb-infused room experienced an improved quality of sleep.

Meanwhile, should you suffer from seasonal allergies, which in turn cause insomnia, you might want to consider brewing Rooibos Tea. This South African Herbal Tea contains a bioflavonoid called quercetin. Evidence suggests that quercetin has antihistamine properties capable of blocking the release of histamine from mast cells to curb symptoms. The bottom line is that whatever your sleeping needs, Tea could help.

Does Tea Help You Sleep Under All Circumstances?

Will a cup of Tea help you sleep, no matter what? Not quite. Different types of Tea will work for different people in different ways. Not everyone will experience the health benefits, unfortunately, and there’s also a slight chance of side effects. We recommend that you speak to a medical professional if you have any concerns. First and foremost, we care about the welfare of our customers.

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